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Diplo Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme Priyanthi Daluwatte reports this exchange from her online classroom on the theme of Google leaving China:


Google and Civil Society
by Participant A (24/03/2010 14:43)
Locate
I appreciate your concern
for the Civil Society Participant B. Let us hear from Xu Jing who is
from
China and is worried about her Google account. She may not be able
to
sum up the reactions from the masses. Nevertheless, she can write
her
opinion. Since we have been following the matter it will be of
interest
if Participant C provides us some input.

=>
Summary of Google service
by Participant B (24/03/2010 20:34)
Locate
Link To:
http://www.google.com/prc/report.html#hl=en
This page offers a summary
of Google service accessibility from within mainland China.
Anyone interested
in following Google China debacle can go through the summary for
the
accessibility of google services.





Google will leave China
by Participant C (22/03/2010 15:04)
Locate
Now people in China is talking
about Google's leave from China by the end of March this year.
Google
first followed Chinese governmental regulation on content censorship

and got a lot of criticism around the world. They it gave up
following
censorship so its relationship with Chinese government was broken. I

don't know what will happen if Google left China. Will my gmail
address
operate as usual?

=>
Google Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship
by Priyanthi Daluwatte (23/03/2010 20:46)
Locate
Link To:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/23/technology/23google.html
Just over two months after
threatening to leave China because of censorship and intrusions
from
hackers, Google on Monday closed its Internet search service
there and
began directing users in that country to its uncensored search
engine
in Hong Kong.



Google leaving China
by Participant A (22/03/2010 16:01)
Locate
Link To:
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/01/google-censorship-china/
Dear Participant C, Your Gmail
will operate as usual, I hope. You may like to read an article
which
appeared in www.wired.com
in Jan 2010. Google concluded that the primary
goal of the attackers who targeted its network was to hack into
the
Gmail accounts of Chinese human rights activists. The attackers
appeared,
however, to succeed at obtaining access to only two accounts.
That access
was limited to basic account information, such as the date the
account
was created and the subject lines of e-mail, not the content of
the
correspondence. Google spokesman Gabriel Stricker told Threat
Level
that the company has already notified the owners of those
accounts.
Read More http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/01/google-censorship-china/#i...
Latest news from Top Tech is consoling: A report in the
Shanghai-based
China Business News is quoting an unidentified advertising
agency executive
as saying that Google has decided to "pull out" of China as
of April 10. But the Wall Street Journal quoted Google chief
executive
Eric Schmidt as saying that the company was in "active
negotiations"
with the Chinese government. Further reading can be from :http://www.toptechnews.com/story,
under heading:Google May End Chinese Operations in April,
reported on
22 March 2010. Let us hope for the best i.e. negotiations must
be fruitful.


=>
Google Exit Rumors
by Participant B (22/03/2010 17:47)
Locate
Link To:
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2010-03/12/content_9577021.htm
I find it hard to see Google’s
exit from China materializing and as one report denies all
the rumors
of Google’s exit.







Should Google pull out of China?
by Priyanthi Daluwatte (23/03/2010 20:42)
Locate
Link To:
http://newsforums.bbc.co.uk/nol/thread.jspa?forumID=7411
I hope by now, your gmail
is stIl working Participant C. Hope the class would enjoy reading the
blog
posts on google leaving China as discussed in the BBC. The US
state
department has said it will make a formal protest to China and
demand
an explanation over alleged cyber-attacks on Google. Should the
company
leave China? Nearly 340 million Chinese people now online,
compared
with 10 million only a decade ago. Unlike most markets, Google
comes
second in search in China. It has 31% of the market compared
with about
60% controlled by market leader Baidu, which has a close
relationship
with the Chinese government. Yahoo has less than 10%. Are you in
China?
Do you think Google should pull out of China? What is the future
for
foreign internet firms in China? The following blog highlights
interesting
views.

=>
Should Google pull out of China
by Participant B (24/03/2010 10:17)
Locate
Morally they should business
profits wise they should not but I hope that this time the
stand on
principles and morality should prevail on cash flows and
market shares.


=>
China Unicom ditches Google on mobiles
by Participant B (26/03/2010 08:23)
Locate
Link To:
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/e30c04c2-3772-11df-9176-00144feabdc0.html
China’s second-largest
mobile operator has announced it will remove Google’s
search function
from new handsets developed with the US company in the
first concrete
fallout of the clash with Beijing over internet
censorship.












Google in Hongkong: google.com.hk
by Participant A (24/03/2010 14:13)
Locate
Link To:
http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/03/new-approach-to-china-update.html
To Priyanthi and Participant C ; Kindly read the latest news on this much debated issue: "On
Monday,
visitors to Google.cn were being redirected to Google's
Chinese-language
service based in Hong Kong. Google does not censor those
results, but
Chinese government filters can restrict the results that are
seen by
mainland audiences. The Hong Kong page heralded the shift with
this
announcement: "Welcome to Google Search in China's new home."
The site also began displaying search results in the simplified
Chinese
characters that are used in mainland China. Google's move comes
after
a 2 1/2-month impasse pitting the world's most powerful Internet
company
against the government of the world's most populous country."
"Users
visiting Google.cn are now being redirected to Google.com.hk, where
we are offering uncensored search in simplified Chinese,
specifically
designed for users in mainland China and delivered via our
servers in
Hong Kong. Users in Hong Kong will continue to receive their
existing
uncensored, traditional Chinese service, also from Google.com.hk. Due
to the increased load on our Hong Kong servers and the
complicated nature
of these changes, users may see some slowdown in service or find
some
products temporarily inaccessible as we switch everything over."

The above issue needs to be discussed in our online sessions and
we
can invite the opinions/reactions from our colleagues. Is it not
a matter
of ISP and enforcement of law in various countries? I feel, the
Chinese
Government is clear in its approaches since it does not want any
security
breaches and that it wants to integrity. I am unable to
understand the
following text: " to balance Google's disdain for China's
Internet
rules with the company's desire to profit from an explosively
growing
market." Our 3rd Online discussion may highlight this right of
governments to enforce laws considering the citizens welfare of
that
country.

=>
Google in China
by Participant B (24/03/2010 14:35)
Locate
Participant A in this whole debacle
between Google and Chinese Government one voice is missing
i.e. what
does the civil society wants? It would be great if Participant C can
provide
some inputs on how do people feel about it?












Google and China : google.com.hk
by Participant A (24/03/2010 14:14)
Locate
To Priyanthi and Participant C ; Kindly read the latest news on this much debated issue: "On Monday,
visitors to Google.cn were being redirected to Google's
Chinese-language
service based in Hong Kong. Google does not censor those results,
but
Chinese government filters can restrict the results that are seen by

mainland audiences. The Hong Kong page heralded the shift with this
announcement: "Welcome to Google Search in China's new home."
The site also began displaying search results in the simplified
Chinese
characters that are used in mainland China. Google's move comes
after
a 2 1/2-month impasse pitting the world's most powerful Internet
company
against the government of the world's most populous country." "Users

visiting Google.cn are now being redirected to Google.com.hk, where
we are offering uncensored search in simplified Chinese,
specifically
designed for users in mainland China and delivered via our servers
in
Hong Kong. Users in Hong Kong will continue to receive their
existing
uncensored, traditional Chinese service, also from Google.com.hk. Due
to the increased load on our Hong Kong servers and the complicated
nature
of these changes, users may see some slowdown in service or find
some
products temporarily inaccessible as we switch everything over."
The above issue needs to be discussed in our online sessions and we
can invite the opinions/reactions from our colleagues. Is it not a
matter
of ISP and enforcement of law in various countries? I feel, the
Chinese
Government is clear in its approaches since it does not want any
security
breaches and that it wants to integrity. I am unable to understand
the
following text: " to balance Google's disdain for China's Internet
rules with the company's desire to profit from an explosively
growing
market." Our 3rd Online discussion may highlight this right of
governments to enforce laws considering the citizens welfare of that

country.


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